&Follow SJoin OnSugar
The art of crafting an effective resume should be taught in school since it's so meaningful in our working lives. Most of us learned how to create our resumes from online samples and campus career-counseling handbooks, but those basic examples can only help us so much. While I'm not a professional career counselor or resume builder, I have a keen eye for resume blunders and have been helping my friends with their resumes for years. Think your resume could use a second opinion? Upload your resume without your personal information (or private message me) and I'll offer my advice on how to polish it to perfection.

Web Marketing Résumé, Remedied

Posted By Smart Living on May 16, 2008 at 9:27AM

TeamSugar member qtpy17 is starting to look for a job in the web marketing field and is looking for advice on how to improve her résumé, so she shared it in my Résumé Remedy group. She has a lot of varied experience, from teaching high school English to working as a content manager for an online apparel company, and is currently a training and quality assurance specialist for a medical center. I think she's done a great job but it feels like a first draft of her résumé, and with a few improvements it will feel much more complete.

Check out my suggestions and feel free to share your own! Just read more

Recent Graduate Résumé, Remedied

Posted By Smart Living on May 14, 2008 at 1:05PM

TeamSugar memeber fashionhore has just graduated and is looking for her first job out of school, ideally in print journalism. She's hoping to make herself stand out from the other recent graduates, so she shared her résumé in my Résumé Remedy group. I think she already has an edge against her competition — she has a lot of relevant experience in her field, while many college students aren't sure what direction they want to take and explore various unrelated internships. The trick is to leverage all of her great experience and showcase the varied skills she learned through each job.

Check out my advice, and of course your own suggestions are welcome! Just read more

Benefits Administrator Résumé, Remedied

Posted By Smart Living on May 12, 2008 at 11:31AM

TeamSugar member chibarosa has been working the same job for eight years and is looking to do the same kind of work in a different environment. She's been getting some responses but they're for sales positions, which isn't the direction she wants to take. She's worried that her summary section is too soft and doesn't know how to quantify her achievements.

  1. So, what's been up for the past eight years? I'd recommend getting rid of the summary section and bumping up the job she's held for the last eight years. That's the largest portion of her experience by far and it should be the first thing to catch the eye of a potential employer. The summary section is unnecessary, distracting, and that space should be used to describe her accomplishments from nearly a decade of hard work.

To see the rest of my observations and suggestions just read more

Moving to LA Résumé, Remedied

Posted By Smart Living on May 9, 2008 at 6:44AM

TeamSugar member ErieIndiana is moving to LA and will need a new job in her new city, so she submitted her résumé to my Resume Remedy group to get it ready for her job search. She's concerned about what's appropriate to include and what isn't and said, "I have research experience from college but I am unsure whether or not I should keep it. I am also published... but should I include that as well? It pushes my resume to 2 pages and it might not be important to the jobs that I apply for. I imagine that I will only be able to apply for assistant/entry level jobs because I don't have a masters."

  1. Order, order! She has a lot of varied experience and manages to pack it all into one page, but we're getting quantity and not quality. Instead of focusing on certain experiences and highlighting them with specific examples of her accomplishments, it shows her range of experience without telling us much about what she got out of all of that work. You're trying to sell yourself with your résumé, and can't do a good sales job if your means to an end isn't put together well. Tailoring résumés is always a good idea, and it's especially important if you have varied experience. Only include your vast research experience if it's relevant to the position for which you're applying; otherwise, choose one or two of the research gigs and place them after your work experience. Also, in general it's a good idea to list your experiences from most recent to oldest.

To see my other suggestions just read more

Graphic Designer's Résumé, Remedied

Posted By Smart Living on May 7, 2008 at 1:01PM

TeamSugar member suzanneheidi is a graphic designer who's had some trouble getting interviews over the past few months. She has enough experience in her field to make a well-focused résumé and is obviously very capable and smart, but she's not sure how to improve what she already has so that employers see her as an attractive applicant.

Before I began my attempt at remedying this résumé, I asked the opinion of our fabulous graphic designer here at Sugar HQ. Here's what she had to say about creating your résumé as a graphic designer: "The biggest thing I would say for a design résumé is not to make it boring. If you are a good designer, your résumé should take some kind of stylistic approach to make it stand out from the boring white Word document résumés. I feel that if you are applying for a creative job, you should strive to show you are creative right off the bat. Some people feel differently, but I think it really depends on the company where you're applying."

I love her advice about giving your résumé a more creative edge depending on the company to which you're applying. Check out my observations and advice when you read more

Account Manager Résumé, Remedied

Posted By Smart Living on May 5, 2008 at 12:25PM

TeamSugar user jenwils01 shared her résumé in my Résumé Remedy group — she's looking for some help in spelling out her current accomplishments because it's difficult to put soft skills into straightforward sentences. She has a good understanding of her responsibilities as an account manager where her main focus is relationship development, but she's also attentive to her duties as a salesperson with the goal of increasing revenue. Here are my observations and recommendations, and of course you're encouraged to share your own in the comments.

  1. She's more accomplished than she lets on: It has the backbone of a good résumé, but it seems to be missing some of the meat. She wants to convey that she's made the most of her experiences and give a prospective employer something to bite into. By simply stating her responsibilities she's selling herself short — she wants them to know that she's both capable and accomplished.

See my other observations and advice when you read more

Entry-Level Résumé, Remedied

Posted By Smart Living on May 2, 2008 at 11:48AM

TeamSugar user yoruhana posted her "Entry-Levelness Resume" in my Résumé Remedy group — she's a year out of college and looking for something new because the company where she held her first job is undergoing financial troubles. Her current resume implies that she's a highly-desirable candidate — she has a good education and made the most of her time during college with various internships — yet she's having trouble getting an employer to bite at her applications. She'd like some help making her bulletpoints pop, but I'm going to give my two cents from top to bottom — résumés can be fun! Or maybe it's just me, but let's get started!

  1. Remove the objective, forever! That goes for every résumé, in my opinion. Your objective is something that should be made clear in your cover letter. Maybe there are some recruiters out there who would disagree with me, but I find the whole objective minisection to be old-fashioned. It's something that just fills space and doesn't give an employer any key information about an applicant.
  2. Skills shouldn't appear at the top. Move the skills section to the bottom. Your experience is what matters and makes you unique, while your skills are technical qualifications that generally don't make you stand out. If you choose to include Microsoft Office in your skills, which I don't think is particularly necessary in your case, I recommend stating it last.

Find out how else I would remedy this résumé when you read more

Résumé Need a Makeover? Join This Savvy Group!

Posted By Smart Living on Apr 29, 2008 at 12:57PM

The art of crafting an effective résumé should be taught in school since it's so meaningful in our working lives. Most of us learned how to create our résumés from online samples and campus career-counseling handbooks, but those basic examples can only help us so much.

While I'm not a professional career counselor or résumé builder, I have a keen eye for résumé blunders and have been helping my friends with their résumés for years. Think your résumé could use a second opinion? Don't let your accomplished background go unnoticed because it's lacking in presentation — join my Resume Remedy group to get my suggestions on how to bring your résumé from under the weather to perfect health. Share your résumé, minus your personal details, and I'll offer my advice on how to polish it to perfection.

Need directions on how to upload your resume? Just read more